Purging in Maine

This weekend I took a trip to my parents’ house in Maine partly because I wont be home for thanksgiving and partly because I am donating a bunch of my clothing and other random things to my brothers.  Anything that is left over (what my brothers don’t want) my parents will bring to GoodWill or Salvation Army.  I decided to rent a car from Hertz because it was almost as cheap as taking the bus ($80 including gas compared to $77 on the bus).  Also, the bus schedules didn’t really work for my plans this weekend so the car rental seemed much better.

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My first rental car of being 25, the Nissan Cube, a surprisingly roomy and smooth ride, I like it even though it happens to look like a clown car. Let's just say I'd drive it, but I wouldn't want my picture taken while driving it.

Since my brothers all moved away from home, my parents have gotten onto this kick of purging the household of all our old crap.  It’s amazing the things that you hang onto over the years.  We basically had a basement which could have doubled as a sporting goods store with probably around 20+ years of sporting equipment.  Not sure we still need the size 5 hockey skates from 20 years ago.  Anyway, earlier this fall my parents filled our garage with almost 27 years worth of stuff and either gave it away, brought it to the “free stuff” section at the dump (or transfer station as they call it here), or simply threw it away.  Here’s a picture of most of my stuff:

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I brought the CCM hockey bag full of stuff from my apartment in Boston. The other boxes are things of mine from the past 25 years of my life, mostly binders and notebooks from high school.

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Let's put these things on the list of stuff I don't need; a cd player and cds in their cases. They worked great in high school but I think it's time to move on.

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Miscellaneous hockey trophies and mini hockey sticks. We literally got trophies for almost every tournament we played in growing up. We kept a few of the more significant ones but we're pitching the rest.

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A box of Tufts stuff from my first campus tour as a prospective student. They rejected me on my first go-around and now I have two degrees from them. Thanks guys 🙂

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A fake femur from my first co-op job at Stryker Orthopaedics. This one is missing the femoral head because I practiced putting in a hip implant. Cool but ultimately a useless thing to hang on to. I don't know how to recycle a fake femur so I'm going to have to throw this one out.

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I'm actually holding it on the wrong side (oops), it's a left hip replacement not a right.

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Binders from Stevens and Tufts. I figured I'd hang onto them until I had my diploma and now that I have my degrees, I think it's time to get rid of the coursework. I recycled all the paper and the binders will go to the "free" section at the dump so someone can reuse them, they're in fine condition.

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The only living (now dead) thing interested in all this old junk was this spider.

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Pamphlets from all my old college tours. Not sure why we decided to hang onto all this junk from R.I.T. considering I decided not to go there (great school + no financial aid = time to find another school).

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Notebooks from high school... and a pair of boxers? Wtf?

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Jorts from my broomball championship last year and yes, these are coming back to Boston and counting toward my 100 items.

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When my grandmother died we went through some of her old stuff on the farm. Here's an ice saw used for sawing ice on the farm. They used to saw ice that was 8 feet thick. Badass.

I donated the Dulcimer I built in college at the M.F.A. to my parents as artwork for the kitchen. It has value to me because I built it but I don't play it therefore I don't need it at my apartment in Boston. It's an excellent addition to the feng shui of the kitchen back home though.

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This doesn't have to do with my 100 item challenge, but Saturday night I went to a UMaine Ice Hockey game and it was awesome, good times even though their program has gone WAY downhill since I lived back home :).

All in all, we pitched a ton of stuff from over the years, recycling all of the paper and plastic of course.  Growing up my parents definitely helped instill in me a sense that recycling was important.  Also with my “Life Without the Landfill” challenge still fresh in my mind, making sure that we threw out as little as possible was an important consideration.  The things my parents kept involved a few sports awards from high school, some old journals that will be fun to look through years from now, and notes/photos from old girlfriends that I hope my future wife/kids will look through and laugh at.  I brought back a few sentimental items that are irreplaceable but not worth keeping at my apartment.  Namely this was my Boston Marathon 2010 Medal and Jacket.  Totally worth keeping because it was probably the largest athletic accomplishment of my life (perhaps except the Spartan Beast Half Marathon in Vermont, but the jury is still out on that one)  but I don’t have a use for these keepsakes day-day in Boston so they’ll stay at my parents’ house for the time being.

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